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  • 2023-01-04 - Extending GitHub Actions with Annotations

    With the introduction of GitHub Actions automated testing became more accessible and integrated into the pull requests to make it more clear what is being merged and if it checks off all requirements. This makes other services like Dependabot easy to use and keep your code up to date, but these small changes in dependencies for example. Reviewing code or documentation changes can be more difficult when a linter like yamllint or flake8 gives an error or warning as you have to dig into the logs to search for what is wrong.

    GitHub Actions also support annotations that can be presented in the web interface to directly see which notifications there are including files and line numbers as shown below. This way feedback from a workflow executed by GitHub Actions is presented in the web interface.

    Annotation in GitHub Actions

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  • 2023-01-03 - Require a specific Terraform version

    HashiCorp offers Terraform Cloud as a service to run Terraform and keep the state instead of having a local copy of the state databases. This is great to make full use of Infrastructure-as-Code tools like Terraform and everyone can run them without losing the correct state. But when setting up a deployment plan a specific version of Terraform has to be selected manually in the webinterface, and you also have to manually increase it when new versions come out.

    As the version, for now, can only be set via the webinterface of Terraform Cloud and allow a lot of people to forget to set it to a higher version causing life-cycle-management issues plans do work for repository A, but not for repository B as both plans use a different version of Terraform. While currently now option exists to define the version of Terraform to use when the plan runs, the configuration allows to specify the version of Terraform is required.

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  • 2022-08-21 - Use specific Vagrant version on Fedora

    Vagrant is a tool for building and managing virtual machines locally with just a few commands and a single file. It is a good way to get started with infrastructure-as-code on your local machine. Vagrant is also shipped with Fedora to make it easier to install and use as it uses libvirt to manage the virtual machines running on Linux with kernel virtualization to provide virtual hardware. This works well until you also want to install Terraform from the HashiCorp repository and later you upgrade Vagrant to a newer version with a regular package update.

    In the example above Vagrant fails to find libvirt to connect to KVM and manage the virtual machine. Multiple providers are available for Vagrant to use, but the one that is used is not the one that is installed on the machine or can be used. This is a known issue with Vagrant on Linux and does not use the system Ruby environment with the lirbary for libvirt. Downgrading to the version of Vagrant that is shipped with Fedora will fix this issue.

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  • 2022-08-20 - Run Terraform within GitHub Codespaces

    Using GitHub Codespaces allows you to work on your code from almost any place in the world without an Internet connection. Only the devcontainers powering Codespaces are mended to be short-lived and not contain any credentials. This may pose a challenge when you’re depending on remote services like Terraform Cloud that require an API-token to work properly.

    Most devcontainers are following the Microsoft devcontainer template and those are based on Debian which gives you access to a huge repository of packaged software. Only Terraform isn’t part of the standard Debian repository, but HashiCorp provides its own repository that can be added. Let’s start by extending the Dockerfile to add the repository and install the Terraform package as highlighted below.

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  • 2022-05-28 - Scanning with KICS for issues in Terraform

    During a recent OWASP Netherlands meetup security scanners were discussed to prevent mistakes and also Checkmarx presented their tool KICS for scanning for security vulnerabilities and configuration errors in Infrastructure-as-Code. Development of KICS goes fast since late 2020 and can catch some common mistakes with known Infrastructure-as-Code definitions like Terraform, Cloudformation, and Ansible for example.

    KICS can be used as a standalone scanner as it is written in Go and with GitHub Actions. For now, let’s test it with a Terraform configuration in a GitHub Workflow to see how it works and how useful it is. Maybe in the future, we will test it with Ansible and Docker as well.

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