Categories
Internet, Unix en security

Adopting NetBeans

Duke with helmetI’m from the Borland “blue” IDE generation and it was my favorite IDE for both Pascal as C/C++. But somewhere around Borland C/C++ 4.5 they changed to a Windows-interface and I was horrified at the time. I never found a good replacement and I tried a lot. KDeveloper looked promising, but limited to KDE-only at the time I stopped using it.

A lot people advised me to try Eclipse and so I did. I only ended up in wanting to shoot the bureaucrat who designed it. At the time NetBeans was also still a pain to use, but now with generation 6 is becomes a good alternative to use. It supports Java and C/C++, but also PHP, Python and Ruby. And tons of useful things like screening your code for FIXME-statements, but also ways to use remote webservers and repositories.

I’m now already on version 6.5.1 and using it more and more for PHP-development. Hopefully version 6.7 will become faster and less memory hungery as 500 MB allocated memory for an IDE is somewhat on the big side. This may be related to Java on 64 bits Linux, but I still need to test it on OpenSolaris for comparison. But for now it seems I found my new IDE as I’m slowly adopting it for more and more tasks.

Categories
Internet, Unix en security

JavaOne 2009

Duke with helmetJava has had a bad start and has a bad image, but it appears to change as also shows during JavaOne 2009. The changes with Java 5 and Java 6 are starting to show for the better. But the most important highlights for now are JavaFX, project Jigsaw and the Java Store. If I needed to choose between .NET or Java for a new project, then I would put my money on Java.

The most important news may be that Classpath is going to disappear and that you can strip down Java to only ship what you need. Here comes project Jigsaw into the picture to get Java on every computer, phone and appliciance and in a shape it should be in for that situation. With a live presentation of a working television that was able to run JavaFX it may become clear where the newly announces Java Store fits in.

It all starts to fit together with upcoming NetBeans 6.7 when you take project Kenai and Zembly into account. There are developer tools, a place to host your development and application, a place to sell it and also a device to run it on. Is Java going to change television as it did with mobile phones?